Audi S5 Oil Capacity and Oil Type

The Audi S5 is a sleek, powerful car that can handle any driving situation with ease. This car has some of the best features on the market today.

Because engine oil is essential for optimum function, as well as a car’s long-term performance and dependability.

The proper oil, on the other hand, ensures that the engine runs smoothly. Oil maintains between the mechanical components of the layer to avoid them from coming into direct touch with each other, thus preventing damage and ensuring engine durability.

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Audi S5 Oil Capacity and Oil Type

Engine Oil Capacity (with filter) Oil Type
4.2L 8-cyl Engine CAUA 9.3 quarts (8.8 liters) 5W-40, 5W-30, 0W-40, 0W-30
3.0L 6-cyl Engine CCBA 6.6 quarts (6.2 liters) 5W-40, 5W-30, 0W-40, 0W-30
3.0L 6-cyl Engine CAKA 6.6 quarts (6.2 liters) 5W-40, 5W-30, 0W-40, 0W-30

 

2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Audi S5 Oil Capacity and Oil Type

Engine Oil Capacity (with filter) Oil Type
3.0L 6-cyl Engine CTUB 7.2 quarts (6.8 liters) 5W-40, 5W-30, 0W-40, 0W-30

 

2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 Audi S5 Oil Capacity and Oil Type

Engine Oil Capacity (with filter) Oil Type
3.0L 6-cyl Engine CWGD Turbo 7.7 quarts (7.3 liters) 0W-20

 

What Kind Of Oil Does an Audi S5 Take?

Different engine oils are available in a variety of viscosities to meet the needs of various engines. The proper viscosity grade for your vehicle is determined by the kind of fuel used, engine design, and climatic or seasonal conditions where you drive. For gasoline engines running under normal driving conditions, oil with an SAE 0W-20 viscosity may be used across all temperature ranges.

Mineral, partially synthetic, and fully synthetic oils are available. Mineral oils are made from crude oil that has been economically refined and filtered of undesirable impurities and additives like waxes. Synthetic oils are produced through a more complex chemical process to ensure their purity. When components are most stressed, when the engine is cold or hot, they offer better protection because they’re more heat-resistant and resistant to oxidation.

Dan Hoffman

Dan is a co-founder of Engineswork. He knows everything about internal combustion engines. Ask your questions in comments down below this article - he will be glad to help you anytime.

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