Chevrolet Colorado Transmission Fluid Capacity


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The Chevrolet Colorado for 2022 improves on the previous model’s flexibility and versatility while preserving all of its attributes. While the half-ton Chevy Silverado 1500 offers a more oversized family-friendly back seat and greater towing capacity, mid-size Colorado is easier to drive and still has a maximum tow rating of 7700 pounds. In addition, despite its basic base engine, the available 308-hp V-6 is responsive and quick, while the diesel option is efficient and torqueful, producing 369 pound-feet.

The oil-burning mill in the Chevy compares poorly to the diesel Jeep Gladiator, but the bow tie is a better drive and complements the Jeep’s toughness with the competent ZR2 model. The 2022 Colorado’s comfortable driving position and powerful infotainment system are tempered by a lack of driver-assistance technologies and an unattractive interior, but those faults should be less obvious to people seeking a more traditional truck experience.

 

2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Chevy Colorado Transmission Fluid Capacity

Transmission Fluid Capacity Fluid Type
AR5 4WD Manual Transmission 4.9 pints (2.3 liters) GL-3
AR5 RWD Manual Transmission 4.6 pints (2.2 liters) GL-3
4L60-E 4-speed Automatic Transmission Total Fill 11.2 quarts (10.6 liters)
Initial Fill 5 quarts (4.7 liters)
AF6

 

2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 Chevy Colorado Transmission Fluid Capacity

Transmission Fluid Capacity Fluid Type
AR5 4WD Manual Transmission 4.9 pints (2.3 liters) GL-3
AR5 RWD Manual Transmission 4.6 pints (2.2 liters) GL-3
2.5l FSO2106 Manual Transmission 6.3 pints (3 liters) AF6
6L50 6-speed Automatic Transmission Total Fill 11.2 quarts (10.6 liters)
Initial Fill 6.7 quarts (6.3 liters)
AF6
4L60-E 4-speed Automatic Transmission Total Fill 11.2 quarts (10.6 liters)
Initial Fill 5 quarts (4.7 liters)
AF6
8L45 8-speed Automatic Transmission Total Fill 10.9 quarts (10.3 liters)
Initial Fill 7.4 quarts (7 liters)
SL150
8L45 8-speed with Cooler Automatic Transmission Total Fill 11.4 quarts (10.8 liters)
Initial Fill 7.4 quarts (7 liters)
SL150

 

For 2022, the only change to Colorado’s lineup is a new dealer-installed Trail Boss kit. While it doesn’t have as much off-road aggression as the ZR2’s, it improves the LT and Z71’s off-road capabilities. The package includes a leveling kit that raises the suspension by 1.0 inches and adds skid plates to both the front and middle of its underside. It also blackens all of the exterior badges, adds red tow hooks, removes the front air dam, and includes a pair of 17-inch rims based on those used on the ZR2.

The Colorado is a popular vehicle, but its lack of modern driver aids and mediocre interior quality limit its appeal. As a result, we’d suggest the ZR2 model that makes the Chevy stand out among mid-size trucks. That’s the ZR2 with a lifted suspension.

Sure, it’s the most expensive trim level, but it offers a variety of unique equipment, including exotic spool-valve shocks, electronic locking differentials on both axles, and one of the wilder front ends we’ve seen on a modern truck. For better back seats and more space behind the wheel in general, we’d go with the crew cab rather than the diesel engine.

The Colorado comes standard with a 2.0-liter engine that makes 197 horsepower and 150 pound-feet of torque, as well as front-wheel drive or all-wheel drive. In addition, a base four-cylinder with a six-speed automatic transmission, a high-performance 308-hp 3.6L V6 with an eight-speed automated, and a 2.8L diesel four cylinder delivering 369-pound feet of torque are also available. Although the two engines vary significantly in personality, they’re both capable of serving their owner well.

The diesel-powered ZR2 crew cab, at 9.1 seconds to 60 mph, can’t keep up with the V-6-powered LT model, which reached 60 mph in 6.1 seconds. (The crew-cab ZR2 with the V-6 was considerably slower than its standard V-6 variant.) The diesel’s strong suit is its maximum towing capability, offroad trekking ability, and fuel efficiency.

Towing capacity is limited to 7,000 pounds for the V-6 and 7700 pounds for the diesel engine. The Trailering Equipment option is required to unlock Colorado’s maximum towing capabilities (7,000 pounds with the V-6 and 7700 pounds with the diesel). All Colorados include trailer sway control, which activates both truck and trailer brakes if necessary to maintain safe operation.

According to the EPA, the Colorado’s four-cylinder engine delivers up to 19 mpg in the city and 25 mpg on the highway. The V-6 is rated at 18 mpg in the city and 25 on the highway. The six-cylinder crew cab returned 23 mpg when tested on our 75 mph road infrastructure fuel economy route. With estimates of 20 mpg city and 30 mpg highway for its rear-drive diesel engine, it is the most efficient powertrain among competing vehicles. For more information about Colorado’s fuel efficiency, go to the EPA’s website.

Dan Hoffman

Dan is a co-founder of Engineswork. He knows everything about internal combustion engines. Ask your questions in comments down below this article - he will be glad to help you anytime.

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